Marty Rhodes To Lead Stephens Insurance

by Gwen Moritz  on Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2005 2:13 pm  

Marty Rhodes of Little Rock, who sold his Rhodes & Associates insurance agency two and a half years ago, was named Wednesday as president and CEO of Stephens Insurance Services Inc., a subsidiary of the Stephens Group Inc.

Greg Feltus, who has been president and CEO of Stephens Insurance, will become chairman of the company, according to Stephens spokesman Curtis Jeffries.

"Marty Rhodes brings more than 30 years of experience as an insurance professional and owner of a highly successful agency to our organization. It is a natural fit for him and for us," Curt Bradbury, chief operating officer of sister company Stephens Inc., said in a news release.

Rhodes has been charged with expanding the insurance subsidiary's work with clients throughout the Stephens organization, Bradbury said.

Stephens Insurance Services has 15 employees in its Little Rock office, Jeffries said. It is a full-service life, group health and corporate benefits agency licensed in all 50 states. Jeffries would not reveal how much the company writes in annual premium.

Rhodes is a native of Lake Village and a 1972 graduate of Hendrix College at Conway. He founded and owned Rhodes & Associates for 16 years before selling it to publicly traded Brown & Brown in May 2002. In addition to various civic activities, he is a director of Arvest Bank of Central Arkansas.

Stephens Insurance Services was founded in 1987 with the help of legendary insurance broker Bob Hickman. Hickman's own agency was acquired by Stephens after Hickman's death in 1990.

"Stephens Insurance is an integral part of the dynamic Stephens organization, and they have a rich long history of outstanding relationships that date back to Bob Hickman," Mr. Rhodes said. "I am thrilled with this opportunity as I have admired Stephens throughout my career."

 

 

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