Michael Pakko to Deliver State Economic Forecast

by Mark Carter  on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 7:35 am  

Dr. Michael Pakko, the state economic forecaster and chief economist for the University of Arkansas at Little Rock's Institute for Economic Advancement.

Michael Pakko will reveal his latest Arkansas economic forecast at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock's 2012 Economic Forecast Conference Tuesday at the Clinton Presidential Center in Little Rock.

Pakko is the state economic forecaster and chief economist for UALR's Institute for Economic Advancement, which hosts the conference each year. Pakko, a former research economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, authors the blog, ArkansasEconomist.com, where he track the state's economic trends.

This year's event is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. from the Clinton Center's Great Hall. Registration remains open and is available here. Tickets are $85.

In addition to Pakko's Arkansas forecast, Chris Varvares, senior managing director, co-founder and president of Macroeconomic Advisers of St. Louis, will deliver the national economic forecast. 

Varvares has served as the president and a former director of the National Association for Business Economics, as president of the St. Louis chapter, and is a member of the American Economic Association. 

He is also a member of Time Magazine's Board of Economists.

W. Michael Cox, director of the O'Neil Center for Global Markets and Freedom at Southern Methodist University's Cox School of Business, will deliver the luncheon keynote address.

Cox, is the former chief economist for the Federal Reserve. He retired from the Fed in 2009 to the become director of the O’Neil Center. 

He regularly writes for the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Investor’s Business Daily, and is regular guest on C-SPAN, NBC, MSNBC, and Fox News, where he provides commentary on monetary and government policy. 

Cox is author of the 1999 book, Myths of Rich and Poor: Why We're Better Off Than We Think, which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.

His latest YouTube video takes on the question, "Would you give up the Internet for $1 million?", embedded below.

 

 

 

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