Westerman Says Impeachment 'Inevitable,' Darr Sees Political Motives

by Andrew DeMillo, The Associated Press  on Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 9:19 am  

LITTLE ROCK — Arkansas Lt. Gov. Mark Darr showed no signs of relenting in his fight to stay in office on Wednesday, a day after a key member of his party said the Republican's impeachment was "inevitable" over ethics violations tied to his office and campaign spending.

Top state House officials are reviewing the procedures and options for impeaching Darr, who acknowledged to the Ethics Commission last week that he broke state ethics and campaign laws 11 times since 2010 and agreed to pay $11,000 in fines. Darr has blamed the violations on meaningless oversights and contends he didn't personally profit.

Darr, who was elected in 2010, has resisted calls to resign from Democratic Gov. Mike Beebe and every Republican member of the state's delegation. State House Democrats have said they'll try to impeach the lieutenant governor if he doesn't step down.

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On Wednesday. Darr said he believed a bad precedent would be set if he left office over the violations, insisting they weren't intentional.

"I'm in this as long as it's right for me and my family," Darr said on KHTE radio's "Alice Stewart Show."

Darr also said he doesn't hold ill feelings towards those now seeking his removal from office.

"I asked the people of Arkansas for forgiveness and it would be wrong of me to ask for forgiveness if I'm not willing to forgive those people (seeking impeachment)," Darr said.

House Majority Leader Bruce Westerman said Tuesday he was disappointed with Darr's decision and that after talking to several Republicans, he believed there are enough votes to begin the removal process.

"I think the impeachment is inevitable if he chooses not to resign," said Westerman, R-Hot Springs. Westerman said he, too, would vote to impeach Darr.

Under guidelines set in the state constitution, Darr would be suspended if 51 or more members of the House approve an article of impeachment. Senators would then hold a trial, with a two-thirds majority - 24 votes in the 35-member chamber - necessary for a conviction that would permanently remove Darr from office.

Though stopping short of calling for the lieutenant governor's removal, House Speaker Davy Carter said his office was reviewing how an impeachment attempt might proceed. A first step would likely be the appointment of a bipartisan House committee to recommend impeachment procedures.

 

 

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