Hendrix College's Timothy Cloyd Is Your Highest Paid Private College President in Arkansas

Timothy Cloyd, president of Hendrix College in Conway.

The Chronicle of Higher Education has released its lists of the nation's highest-paid public and private college and university presidents, and takes a special look at the perks private college leaders receive.

Let's get this out of the way first: Hendrix College President Timothy J. Cloyd is the top-paid private college president, according to the Chronicle's list, which is based on compensation doled out in 2010 and comprises 493 presidents at colleges with budgets exceeding $50 million. 

(You can view the complete list here, or just the Arkansas list here).

Cloyd receives total compensation of $348,084, the Chronicle says. That places the Conway college president 299th in the nation.

Other Arkansans on the list are:

  • Charles Pollard, John Brown University of Siloam Springs, at $299,482 (No. 355 in the country)
  • David B. Burks, Harding University of Searcy, at $261,827 (No. 403)
  • Rex M. Horne Jr., Ouachita Baptist University of Arkadelphia, at $216,504 (No. 424)

(You might remember that last year, Cloyd showed up on the 2009 list in the top 10, with more than $1 million. But that was an anomaly, because that year Cloyd collected more than $700,000 from eight years of contributions and earnings from a deferred-compensation plan.)

So who's the top dog in the nation in 2010? That'd be Bob Kerrey, who earned $3 million as president of the New School in New York City. Kerrey, who was governor of Nebraska from 1983 to 1987 and a U.S. senator from 1989 to 2001, became president emeritus in 2011.

According to the Chronicle, 36 private-college presidents earned more than $1 million in 2010. We'll note that Arkansas private college presidents earn less than the median compensation, which was $396,649. That figure was a 2.8 percent increase over 2009.

The Chronicle also lists the highest-paid public college leaders, but the list is locked down to subscribers. Arkansas Business readers probably have a pretty good idea of who's on that list.

Please read our comments policy before commenting.