Two Little Rock Projects Reach Milestones

Developers behind two high-profile Little Rock construction projects celebrated milestones Thursday.
Downtown, Little Rock real estate developers Jimmy Moses and Rett Tucker marked the opening of 300 Third, a $45 million, 300,000-SF high-rise that's the tallest residential tower in the state.
Meanwhile, the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences marked the high points for construction of a $203.9 million, 10-floor, 540,000-SF expansion of its medical center and an adjacent $30 million, five-floor, 100,000-SF Psychiatric Research Institute with a double “topping out” ceremony.
The 300 Third building features 95 condominiums and views of the downtown skyline, the Clinton Presidential Library and the Arkansas River. It also has a rooftop deck, a party room, secure reserved parking, a swimming pool, a fitness club and a full-service concierge. The building also has retail and restaurant space.
Announced in October 2004, the tower was built by Hensel Phelps Construction Co., East-Harding and AMR Architects.
At UAMS, officials celebrated construction on the two projects reaching their highest points. Both the hospital expansion and PRI are expected to be completed in late 2008, with occupancy set for January 2009.
"This much-needed expansion moves us far beyond the 50-year-old hospital building where we started on Markham Street and into a facility where the latest in hospital technology, design and vision are combined into a truly patient-focused environment," Richard Pierson, vice chancellor for clinical programs and executive director of UAMS Medical Center, said.
The hospital expansion will include 234 adult beds and 64 neonatal beds, with space for growth that could bring total capacity to 393 private adult patient rooms between the new facility and the hospital’s existing Ward Tower.
The UAMS Psychiatric Research Institute will consolidate most psychiatric clinicians, researchers and educators in one building. Now, the department is scattered among 13 locations in central Arkansas, with about 8,700 patient visits monthly.