Arkansas Business City of Distinction 2011

 

 

The Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame showcases those who have made a major impact on the lives of others and helped to elevate the status of women in our state, our nation, and, in some cases, around the world.

From the Magazine

Note from Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame Chair Holly Fish

If one of these stories creates a spark in a young female mind and leads her to achieve her hopes and dreams, we've done our job. read more >

Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: Maya Angelou, Writer and Activist

By the time Dr. Maya Angelou's words were published in her first book, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," the writer, poet, singer, dancer, filmmaker, actor and activist had already put her whole heart into quite a lot in her 42 years of life. read more >

Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: June B. Freeman, Advocate for the Arts

June Biber Freeman's lifelong love for the arts led her to become an influential and supportive member of Arkansas' growing arts scene. read more >

Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: Dr. Ruth Hawkins, Honoring History and Heritage

Ruth Hawkins is a storyteller at heart, and her own tale — like Mark Twain's — has a river running through it. read more >

Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: Brinda J. Jackson, Groundbreaking Architect

When Brinda J. Jackson became the first African-American valedictorian of Lake Village High School in 1979, a racial slight turned her youth's crowning achievement into a painful, all-night cry. read more >

Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: Bernice Jones, Philanthropic Leader

Keeping up with the Joneses has a double meaning in northwest Arkansas, where Bernice Jones and her husband Harvey blazed a philanthropic trail that won't soon be forgotten. read more >

Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: Pat Lile, Community Champion

Pat Lile is great with a quote. But when the subject is herself and her career it gives her pause, for there is so much to be summed up about a lifetime of service to others. read more >

Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: Judge Elsijane Trimble Roy, Legal Trailblazer

Judge Elsijane Trimble Roy, as Arkansas' first female circuit judge, first female supreme court justice and the first female federal judge appointed in Arkansas, left a lasting legacy upon the state, opening many doors for other women in the legal field. read more >

Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: Dr. Joanna Seibert, Health Care Pioneer

It's been almost 50 years since Dr. Joanna Seibert graduated from University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine and almost 20 years since she was ordained an Episcopal deacon. Yet in all that time, she's never experienced a conflict between science and the sacred. read more >

Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: Dorothy Stuck, Force for Equality

Dorothy Stuck used her unique voice to help people, simply because she believed in them, becoming a force for desegregation in the sometimes intertwined fields of politics and journalism. read more >

Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame: Olivetan Benedictine Sisters, Ministry and Medicine

The Holy Angels Convent in Jonesboro believes God has called on its members to meet the needs of northeast Arkansas for over a century, and they have risen to the occasion each and every time. read more >