Tagged: frank lloyd wright

Architect Ron Shelby on Moving the Frank Lloyd Wright House to Arkansas

by Arkansas Business Staff 8/11/2014 12:00 am

Hight-Jackson and CEO Ron Shelby were chosen to oversee the reassembly of the Bachman Wilson House, designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright and moved from its previous home in New Jersey, on the grounds of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville.

Frank Lloyd Wright House Already Drawing Museum Visitors

by Arkansas Business Staff 7/7/2014 12:00 am

Interest in the reconstruction of the Bachman Wilson House on the grounds of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville is so great that people have been bringing lawn chairs to watch the work progress.

An Interview with Alice Walton: Crystal Bridges An Expression of Love

by Jan Cottingham 3/31/2014 12:00 am

Articles about Alice Walton and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art have tended to focus on big numbers: an $800 million endowment, hundreds of millions of dollars worth of artwork, 200,000 SF of museum space, 250,000 visitors expected to visit the Bentonville showplace yearly. What the stories haven’t done is explain why Walton, the only daughter of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton, chose art as her way to give not just to northwest Arkansas but to the entire world.

UA Students at Fay Jones School of Architecture Getting 'The Wright Stuff'

by Jan Cottingham 2/10/2014 12:00 am

The move of the Bachman Wilson House to the grounds of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is presenting opportunities for students of the Fay Jones School of Architecture at the University of Arkansas.

Relocation of Historic Frank Lloyd Wright House to Crystal Bridges a First

by Jan Cottingham 2/10/2014 12:00 am

In a few weeks, a fully dismantled structure designed by Frank Lloyd Wright will be carefully loaded into vehicles provided by J.B. Hunt Transport Services Inc. and moved some 1,300 miles west to Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville. It will then be carefully unloaded, moved to its new home on the museum’s 120 acres and reassembled, piece by numbered piece.