Tagged: main street lofts

Arbitration Reveals Wide Leeway in Scott Reed Contracts

by Arkansas Business Staff 4/25/2016 12:00 am

When AMR Construction landed an arbitration award for unpaid work on the Main Street Lofts project in downtown Little Rock, the ruling provided a glimpse into the chaotic development world of Scott Reed, who led the ownership group and oversaw the project.

AMR Construction Begins Foreclosure Action on Main Street Lofts

by George Waldon 4/25/2016 12:00 am

Little Rock’s AMR Construction LLC staked a priority claim to recover $896,756 for unpaid work on the unfinished three-building, 125,000-SF redevelopment at 510-524 Main St.

Developers Want Delay of AMR Arbitration Payment

by Arkansas Business Staff 4/18/2016 12:00 am

Main Street Lofts developers are trying to slow a judicial ruling on an unfavorable arbitration outcome.

Mayor Mark Stodola Looks to Keep Main Street Makeover Moving

by George Waldon 9/14/2015 12:00 am

A mix of retail and of-fice buildings that decades ago were part of the city’s historic commercial core have combined with new construction to recast a string of properties. A foundation of restaurants, apartments and the performing arts will be joined by a high-rise hotel redevelopment and the Little Rock Tech Park.

Scott Reed Owes Over $35K in Delinquent Property Taxes

by Arkansas Business Staff 8/17/2015 12:00 am

The West Coast real estate adviser with historic re-development aspirations owes a combined $35,546 on four Main Street buildings. The biggest tab is $14,397 owed for 2012-13 taxes plus penalty and interest on the 62,688-SF M.M. Cohn Building at 510 Main St.

Lawsuit, Liens Hit Scott Reed’s Main Street Projects

by George Waldon 8/3/2015 12:00 am

Contractors have more than $1.5 million in claims for unpaid work on two unfinished Main Street redevelopments in downtown Little Rock. The liens and lawsuit add to a track record of overreaching, underfinanced, subsidy-supported development in the city.

Kent Walker Artisan Cheese Rebounds After Disaster

by Jan Cottingham 3/17/2014 12:00 am

Six months after an equipment failure spoiled 2,500 pounds of carefully handcrafted cheese — his entire inventory, worth about $60,000 retail — Kent Walker is looking into the future, and, he says, it’s bright.