Conlon Settlement Offers Small Payouts to John Rogers Investors


Bill Dickey, New York Yankees catcher and a namesake of Dickey-Stephens Park in North Little Rock, hits warmup in a 1938 photo by Charles M. Conlon.
Bill Dickey, New York Yankees catcher and a namesake of Dickey-Stephens Park in North Little Rock, hits warmup in a 1938 photo by Charles M. Conlon. (Charles M. Conlon)
Bill Dickey, New York Yankees catcher and a namesake of Dickey-Stephens Park in North Little Rock, in a 1938 photo by Charles M. Conlon.
Bill Dickey, New York Yankees catcher and a namesake of Dickey-Stephens Park in North Little Rock, in a 1938 photo by Charles M. Conlon. (Charles M. Conlon)

What was the outcome of the Feb. 1-2 hearing to decide who got what from the auction of the biggest asset remaining from the murky business dealings and insolvent ventures of John Rogers?

Well, there was no hearing.

An 11th-hour settlement spared Pulaski County Circuit Judge Chris Piazza from deciding how to divvy $1.5 million from last year’s auction of the famed Conlon Collection of early 20th Century major league baseball images.

First Arkansas Bank & Trust of Jacksonville got $683,471. The bank held a judgment of more than $15 million against Rogers and his sports memorabilia and photo archive ventures.

Claimants associated with Legendary Auctions of Lansing, Illinois, (Doug and Amy Allen, Bill Fulton, Dale Huizenga and Mark Theotikos) received $407,174..

Mark Roberts of San Francisco, who held a $1.7 million default judgment against Rogers et al, was paid $363,548. The son of George Roberts, billionaire financier and co-founder of private equity firm KKR & Co., Roberts operates the National Pastime Museum, a website for displaying his collection of baseball memorabilia.

Michael McAfee, the court-appointed receiver of Sports Cards Plus and other Rogers enterprises, garnered $68,305 as his 5 percent commission on the sale.

Of the 8,354 glass-plate negatives of Charles Conlon that Rogers purchased in July 2010, only 7,462 remained for the court-ordered auction when the collection was inventoried.